Now Again

Philip Guston "Talking" at MoMA in 2017
Philip Guston “Talking” at MoMA in 2017

It’s been twenty years since the Metropolitan’s Philip Guston Retrospective, a mind-blowing experience for me, and I have not fully recovered. The new Philip Guston retrospective “Now” has opened in Boston with trauma specialists on duty and contextual source material under wraps. But I’m not complaining. I already did that. I’m thrilled. We have tickets for the show and sat in on a series of Zoom talks this weekend put on by the MFA

Musa Meyer, Guston’s daughter, hosted one of the talks. She has devoted the second half of her life to securing her father’s. legacy as president of the Philip Guston Foundation. I have a shelf full of Guston books and the one she wrote, “Night Studio, A Memoir of Philip Guston,” is one of my favorites. I hope her talk becomes available on YouTube because she is as close as we can get to the mind of Guston.

The painting above is in MoMA’s collection and Ross Feld used it on the cover his book, “Guston in Time, Remembering Philip Guston.” Feld was a poet and close friend of Guston’s. I picked his book up at the MAG and liked it so much I bought extra copies as gifts. Years later I discovered our neighbor was also a close friend of Feld’s, went to high school with him and has a few Guston pieces in his collection.

Guston was inspired by and inspired poets, writers (Philip Roth) and musicians. Listen to Morton Feldman’s “For Philip Guston.” And then go out of your way to see Philip Guston paintings.

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Nothing To Explain

Leo Dodd silkscreen "The Hunger of the Elements to Become Life" 1976
Leo Dodd silkscreen “The Hunger of the Elements to Become Life” 1976

In 1975 my father suggested we take a silkscreen class that was being offered by Loretta Murawski at B.O.C.E in Fairport. It was the first class I had taken with my father and I was struck by what a good student he was. He would jump on the assignments, constructing the screens from homemade hinged frames and producing beautiful prints while the rest of us were still trying to figure out what we wanted to do.

The silkscreen above is from a series of prints and I think he also used this image for a Christmas card. My sister, Amy, would remember the details. Leo liked Chesterton and Merton and I often wondered where this phrase came from. I looked it up today and found this excerpt from a 1975 NYT review of a book called, “All The Strange Hours: The Evacuation of a Life” by Loren Eiseley. My father might read the book, he had quite a library, or he may just have read the review. I wish he was still here to talk about it.

Excerpt from NYT review of "All The Strange Hours: The Evacuation of a Life" by Loren Eiseley 12.18.75
Excerpt from NYT review of “All The Strange Hours: The Evacuation of a Life” by Loren Eiseley 12.18.75

I still have the screens we constructed back then in the garage. The ink and screen wash on the market today is far less toxic. We had a few Warhol silkscreens for a while and I love the medium.

Two of Andy Warhol Myths hanging in our office
Two of Andy Warhol Myths hanging in our office

I did a silkscreen run of New Math posters but I don’t have a copy. I photographed this one on the wall at the Bop Shop. Peggi and I silkscreened a hundred Personal Effects t-shirts in our backyard. The time is right to get back into this process.

3 color silkscreen poster for New Math gig at R.I.T Grace Watson Hall on October 7, 1977
3 color silkscreen poster for New Math gig at R.I.T Grace Watson Hall on October 7, 1977
Paul Dodd modeling handmade Personal Effects t-shirts.
Paul Dodd modeling handmade Personal Effects t-shirts.
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Drawing In Space

Colleen Buzzard's installation 4th Floor Anderson Arts 2022. Photo by Peggi Fournier.
Colleen Buzzard’s installation 4th Floor Anderson Arts 2022. Photo by Peggi Fournier.

Colleen Buzzard has one great show after the other in the front room gallery space attached to her studio. For the month of April she will be exhibiting her own work in an exhibition entitled “Shaping the Voids.” This show starts in the hallway on the big wall in front of the 4th floor space with a stunning video presentation of a recent show of her work.

There is an artist statement inside and I suggest you read it. I didn’t but I will try to describe what I experienced. Colleen redefines drawings, not just by by taking them off the page but by letting the drawings make their own drawings, as shadows and reflections. Inside her space you are completely surrounded by drawings, on the walls, the floor and in the air. I encourage you to arrange some time to spend with Colleen Buzzard’s installation.

Shayna Kiblin art at Downtown RIT Gallery
Shayna Kiblin art at Downtown RIT Gallery

RIT’s downtown gallery is showing School of Art and American Crafts MFA thesis exhibitions. I particularly like Shayna Kiblin’s wall hangings. Shayna describes herself as “the dyke to watch out for” and here she takes a deep dive into the feminine colors and textures that were laid out for her at an early age.

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Interactivity

For Fritz (Magna White), acrylic on paper, 18″w by 24″h, 2021 Paul Dodd
For Fritz (Magna White), acrylic on paper, 18″w by 24″h, 2021 Paul Dodd
For Fritz (Rose Madder), acrylic on paper, 18″w by 24″h, 2021 Paul Dodd
For Fritz (Rose Madder), acrylic on paper, 18″w by 24″h, 2021 Paul Dodd
For Fritz (Raw Sienna), acrylic on paper, 18″w by 24″h, 2021 Paul Dodd
For Fritz (Raw Sienna), acrylic on paper, 18″w by 24″h, 2021 Paul Dodd
For Fritz (Bocour Blue), acrylic on paper, 18″w by 24″h, 2021 Paul Dodd
For Fritz (Bocour Blue), acrylic on paper, 18″w by 24″h, 2021 Paul Dodd

I pulled a few of my “For Fritz” paintings out to show some friends over the weekend and by chance these four wound up clustered together below my “Los Inmigrantes.” They played so nicely together I made a note of the four.

I have sixteen of these in total and of course some work better with others. We have six on a wall in our house. None of these are in that cluster. Interesting that hiding some makes others stronger and certain combinations make the individual pieces sing. They are interactive.

While working on the sixteen I wound up with an extra painting of three of the colors. I put one of the those in the Roco Members Show and it sold. The couple who bought it contacted me through this blog and asked if I had any more for sale. I told them I had hoped to show the 16 someday and I would rather not sell them. I mentioned the two other extras and they bought both of those. While they were here they asked if I could do a fourth before retiring the series. And now they have their own cluster out there.

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Arcadian Forms

"Arcadian Forms" acrylic on plastic, 96"w x 24"h 2022
“Arcadian Forms” acrylic on plastic, 96″w x 24″h 2022

Funny, thinking back on the route these pieces took. I started with sketches based on jpegs of figurative paintings snagged from my Tumblr feed. I quickly simplified the forms and decided to limit myself to three parts for each piece. I worked on the drawings on the wall, tweaking the curves for days.

I settled on the four drawings I liked best and developed them as one piece, painting and repainting the parts with acrylic paint, solid colors, some straight from the tube or jar. I determined I didn’t need the negative space on the four sheets of paper and found some 1/8 inch plastic. I photographed the drawings and scaled them up to fit the plastic sheets by projecting them on to the plastic. I took the sheets down to my neighbor, Jared’s, used his jig saw to cut them out. Pete Monacelli helped me mount wood frame to the back of the plastic so I could hang them. Duane helped me photograph the pieces so I could come up with this reproduction.

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This Year’s Model

Four “Untitled” entries to Rochester Contemporary 6×6 Show, acrylic on wood, Paul Dodd 2022
Four “Untitled” entries to Rochester Contemporary 6×6 Show, acrylic on wood, Paul Dodd 2022

I heard that Rochester Contemporary was going back to allowing four entries in their upcoming 6×6 exhibition. They started with ten, reduced the limit to four and then held it at three for the last few years. I was having with this wood motif during those four years. I needed four to work the mathematical variations and then I did variations on those for six years. When they switched their limit to three I entered smashed beer cans in protest.

Virtually the same religiously toned pallet as my stations of the cross with a heftier cream, they are ready to submit. They aren’t really wall pieces, I like the way look sitting on a table or a shelf, so I don’t put any hanging apparatus on them. RoCo figures out a way to hang for the show and then someone takes them home.

I love this rough cut Adirondack pine. Our friends, Pete and Shelley built heir whole house out of it. They gave me some boards from a mill up there. They are all roughly an inch deep none of them are six inches in width so I settled on a pleasing proportion, the smaller band is 1 3/4 high and the bigger band is 4 and 1/4 wide for a total of 6, and I glued them together leaving the rough cut on the top and bottom.

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Overheard

Detail from Joan Lyons "Nathan"s Darkroom 2021 at Colleen Buzzard's Studio
Detail from Joan Lyons “Nathan”s Darkroom 2021 at Colleen Buzzard’s Studio

Overheard at Colleen Buzzard’s Studio: Someone asking a visual artist how they were holding up in the pandemic. “It’s been a little quiet but I have a beautiful house, a nice studio and plenty of time to do work” or something to that effect.  I wanted to second that but stayed quiet. And then at RoCo, later that evening, we ran into a writer who  told us how they couldn’t get anything done during the pandemic.

Granted this thing is not good for depressive types. Someone in the Truman Capote doc that we just watched said, “All writers are voyeurs.” So maybe it is without people to observre a writer could be lost. But that is all broad brush nonsense. Truman did really blew up though with his “Answered Prayers.”

Joan Lyons "Portraits" 1980-1983 Diazo Prints at Colleen Buzzard's Studio
Joan Lyons “Portraits” 1980-1983 Diazo Prints at Colleen Buzzard’s Studio

It was really good to get out, to see new art and laugh through a mask with friends. Joan Lyons show at Colleen Buzzard’s Studio is a real treat. A wall of photos created on Nathan Lyons (who died in 2016) old photo paper, some of it as old as his 40 year old darkroom. Joan doesn’t just click the shutter, she paints with the photo chemicals and exposes the paper to items from Nathan’s darkroom. I particularly liked her Diazo Prints, “Portraits,” made in conjunction with members of their family in the early eighties.

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Just About Everything

Sk path from front door under blue lights
Sk path from front door under blue lights

What are we gonna do when Roberta Smith stops reviewing art? She has no completion. When the Times reviews four or five current gallery shows on Fridays, the ones she covers all sound like must-sees. Granted her seniority must give her dibs on the best shows but she brings so much more to the work. 

Her review of Etel Adnan’s show of recent paintings got me off on a deep dive of Adnan’s poetry and prose. Adnan died in November at 96 and her 2020 book, “Shifting of Silence,” breaks the social taboo on writing and speaking about our own deaths. “Better to admit that with the passing of days we know less about just about everything.”

And covering the sound on sound video artist, Kristin Oppenheim, Smith had me so intrigued I tracked down snippets of Oppenheim’s work on YouTube. While you on YouTube check out Oppenheim’s “Sail On Sailor.” She makes up her own words.

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Forms

There were footprints in the fresh snow on the paths this morning so we weren’t the only ones out there. We didn’t see anyone though. It was only 5 degrees.

Tri color form paintings as sketches
Tri color form paintings as sketches

I’ve been playing around with these bodily forms for a few weeks now. With acrylic paint on paper, solid colors straight from the tube or jar, I limited myself to three colors per piece. I settled on four drawings that worked and tweaked the curves for days. I swapped colors while they were hanging on the wall. I determined I didn’t need the negative space on the sheet of paper that I painted each one on and found some pieces of 1/8 inch plastic that will remain flat after I cut the forms out. The plastic sheets were bigger than my painting sketches so I photographed the sketches and projected the paintings on the plastic sheets.

Four forms drawings on cut plastic
Four forms drawings on cut plastic

I had seen a jig saw in Jared’s garage so I took the sheets down there and asked if I could cut them out. It was a lot harder than I thought it would be to follow my curves. Turns out Jared’s wife, Sue, is the jig saw expert. I came close to just asking her if she could cut my forms out but I eventually got a little better. Peggi tried her hand at it and together we completed the task. Jared’s garage is heated, ours is not, so I plan to file the edges down when it gets a little warmer and then paint them.

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Gallery District

Detail of Nancy Topolski piece in pop-up show on Coolidge Road
Detail of Nancy Topolski piece in pop-up show on Coolidge Road

Colleen Buzzard alerted us to a pop-up show in our neck of the woods so today’s walk started out in the direction of Durand Eastman. Up there I realized I had forgotten my mask so instead of crossing over to Culver we circled back to our house and picked up a mask before going the few blocks to Coolidge. Nancy was helping a friend clean out a house that he bought when it occurred to her that the white walls and wood floors would make an ideal gallery setting for her recent, mostly fabric based sculptures.

The crevice in the piece above was stuffed with dried “Devils Heads,” the seed pods of the invasive Asian water chestnut, that Nancy collected along the Hudson River bank. And below this piece, on the floor was a carefully arranged pile of the pods.

Fabric sculpture in Nancy Topolski pop up show on Coolidge
Fabric sculpture in Nancy Topolski pop up show on Coolidge

Nancy utilized the empty space in dramatic fashion by arranging her pieces in windows and on their sills, in the fireplace and on the hearth. Some hung from the ceiling while others sat on the floor. Right next door someone with Buffalo Bills posters and a campaign sign for Mike Carpinelli (Trump’s “favorite sheriff in New York State”) for Governor in 2222 and right across the street from the giant tree whose trunk has grown so big it no longer fits between the sidewalk and the street is this cute little one story, grey brick home slash gallery. This was a sweet location for an especially sweet show.

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1, 2, 3 Punch

RoCo Members Show. My piece (top center) is in good company with Colleen Buzzard (center left) and Bill Keyser (center bottom).
RoCo Members Show. My piece (top center) is in good company with Colleen Buzzard (center left) and Bill Keyser (center bottom).

With numbers rising again in Monroe County we decided to skip the opening of Rochester Contemporary’s Members Show. We stopped by today and enjoyed the luxury of an uncrowded gallery with lots of art. More than ever.

I’ve always liked this show. Un-curated, democratic, wildly varied. Each member gets to contribute one piece. Bill Keyser’s piece, sitting on the white pedestal on the first wall, caught my attention immediately. I shouldn’t have said “sitting on a pedestal,” it jumps out at you. Only then did I notice my entry on the wall behind it. Peggi noted that the quiet quality of my piece provided air for Bill’s work. And the coolest thing of all is how Colleen Buzzard’s 3D drawing (bottom left of my piece) comes off the wall to animate the space and open the door for Bill Keyser’s sculpture. Congratulations to whoever it was that hung the show.

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Go Ahead

Log in sand swirl at Durand Eastman Beach
Log in sand swirl at Durand Eastman Beach

Fine. Paint, sculpt. But good luck coming up with something as beautiful as this log nestled in the sand along Durand Eastman beach.

The beach was completely rearranged this morning by yesterday’s heavy rain and pounding waves. This log was nearly twelve feet long and it wasn’t there yesterday. It most likely came down the river out into the lake and then drifted eastward until washing ashore. If it is still there tomorrow it won’t be arranged like this.

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Doubts & Questions

Paul Dodd Untitled Abstract circa 1995
Paul Dodd Untitled Abstract circa 1995

I did a dozen or so abstract, acrylic paintings in the mid nineties and hung onto a few before moving on. I dusted (literally) this one off today and took a photo. I’m working on some flat color, organic form, almost figurative paintings now. Full of doubts and questions but coming up with enough answers to move forward.

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Stir It Up

Cathy Smith paint sticks installation at Colleen Buzzard's Studio
Cathy Smith paint sticks installation at Colleen Buzzard’s Studio

Every visit to Colleen Buzzard’s studio is special. The shows Colleen curates and presents in the front room are top shelf. Every object in her backroom studio space is purposeful or unresolved. The line blurs as they are in the process of becoming an art piece. Your mind clears on entry. You begin to ask questions. You leave stimulated.

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Los Inmigrantes

"Los Inmigrantes," found drift wood, 15"h x 101"w by Paul Dodd 2021
“Los Inmigrantes,” found drift wood, 15″h x 101″w by Paul Dodd 2021

I collected driftwood this summer, not every day, just when the conditions were right. The lakeshore rearranges itself daily. The waves sift and sort the tiny stones, the small stones, the shells, the seaweed and the sand, and it often presents the ingredients in an array at the edge of the lake. Plastic pieces only wash ashore under the right circumstances. We often see a woman collecting burnished pieces of glass.

Detail of "Los Inmigrantes," found drift wood, 15"h x 101"w x 2"d by Paul Dodd 2021
Detail of “Los Inmigrantes,” found drift wood, 15″h x 101″w x 2″d by Paul Dodd 2021

These wooden pieces, mostly pieces of bark worn by tumbling, are strewn along the beach after a storm. I imagine them coming down the river and then eastward to Durand. They make me think of los inmigrantes who, fleeing North Africa in overcrowded boats, often wash ashore in southern Spain.

I had a hell of time photographing the piece. Facetimed with Duane for help. Nineteen of them mounted on a white wall. The beauty of the wood is the subtle, warm colors but that is not the hard part. I mounted the wood pieces with two finishing nails, one end backed into the rear of the wood pieces and the other into the wall. So the pieces are suspended about a half inch off the wall. I wanted to show that relief but in order to light the wood properly I wound up casting strong shadows that made the pieces look like they were vibrating. Duane solved that for me.

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L’art Pour L’art

"Massacre of the Innocents" by Marcantonio Raimondi at Memorial Art Gallery show "Renaissance Impressions"
“Massacre of the Innocents” by Marcantonio Raimondi at Memorial Art Gallery show “Renaissance Impressions”

A show of Renaissance Prints. may not sound all that exciting but just imagine being alive in the early 1500s when images of the ancient myths and religious miracles were mostly in your imagination. The Judgement of Paris, The Massacre of the Innocents, and The Martyrdom of Saint Lawrence , where Larry asks his tormentors to “Turn me over, I’m done on this side,” are just some of the fantastic stories depicted in the Memorial Art Gallery’s current exhibit of Renaissance Prints. The show is mind blowing.

MAG Curatorial Assistant Lauren Tagliaferro did a Zoom talk for MAG members the day the show opened and it is now up on YouTube. Peggi and I just watched it a second time. Lauren is a dynamo and she brings art history to life. How we created a beautiful Christ, even eroticized him and the saints to sell the concept, suffering in peace for eternal salvation. How we depict the old as ugly because we are afraid of dying. Tagliaferro is drawn to ugliness as much beauty and she admits a lot of her ideas come from “On Ugliness” by Umberto Eco. She is an adjunct professor at RIT. They should give her tenure now.

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Surrounding Ourselves

Anne Havens sculpture from "Sleeping Around" series 2007
Anne Havens sculpture from “Sleeping Around” series 2007

With all the quarantining going on we only had one chance to spend time with Anne Havens before she left for her winter home. Over coffee, scones, dates and roasted Marcona almonds and surrounded by Anne Havens artwork, it could only be from her hand, hanging gallery style on white walls in her open plan home, we talked about art making, specifically how and why Anne has always made art. It has been a lifeline in turbulent waters. Magical art doesn’t come out of nowhere. We came home with a head from her “Sleeping Around” series.

Every three weeks or so we run into Ernie and his owner out for a walk. They live in the neighborhood and over the years polite talk has turned meatier subjects. He is a photographer and we often talk art. We learned he and his wife acquired some pieces, a print, a drawing and a small painting by my favorite artist in the world. I couldn’t wait to see them. And then the pandemic hit. Our self imposed restrictions have eased and we stopped by on our way home from a walk. I was blown away. On top of that we came home with two of Ernie’s owner’s photos. Warren Philips will work his magic on the frames.

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Below Canal

Stephana McClure drawing based on George Cukor's "Gaslight" at Bienvenu Steinberg & Partner in Tribeca
Stephana McClure drawing based on George Cukor’s “Gaslight” at Bienvenu Steinberg & Partner in Tribeca

Before leaving for NYC we took an armload of collard greens from our garden down to our friends Helena and Jedi. They invited us to dinner but we we told them we were headed to NYC. They told us we must go see Hamilton. Their nephew, an Eastman graduate who plays Washington, arranged to get us discounted tickets. Our third full day in the city revolved around Broadway.

Duane’s place in Brooklyn is as comfortable as home so we hung around there for the morning and took the F train in after noon. We stopped in Tribeca where we carved out a three block chunk of galleries, below Canal with Church Street to the West and Broadway to the east, we went up and down both sides of Lispenard, Franklin and White Streets. The latter being where the Mudd Club was.

Artist Space had an installation of Milford Graves works, videos, hand painted records and even his drums. He was not only a drummer but a botanist, a professor at Bennington, a cardiac technician and a visual artist. We watched a full size stock-ticker scroll by in another gallery while listening to a celestial Greek soundtrack. We spent some serious time at Bienvenu Steinberg & Partner with a fabulous show called “I See You Seeing Me (Meeting the Female Gaze)” by Stephana McClure. The drawing above was done done in reverse. The artist projected George Cukor’s “Gaslight” on her monochromatic drawing and rubbed over the subtitles of each line of dialog. I was so enamored with this piece I asked how much it was. $8,000 did not seem so bad. In the necklace/wall hanging below she wove Italian twine and strung it with vintage axe heads wrapped in prose from Joan Didion’s “The Year of Magical Thinking.”

Stephana McClure's axe head necklace as wall hanging at Bienvenu Steinberg & Partner
Stephana McClure’s axe head necklace as wall hanging at Bienvenu Steinberg & Partner

The play was on 46th Street just off Times Square. NYC has one sixth the positivity rate of our area so the city felt safe except for Times Square. It is just an insane glimpse of our dystopian future. Street venders selling all sorts of crap, designer knock-off purses and watches, chain stores and fast food, blocks of buildings covered in LED monitors, each playing non stop commercials. A guy with a full head mask of Donald Trump stood in the middle of an intersection directing traffic.

With Hamilton I found it odd that the lead character, the guy the play is named after, feels like a minor character. We waited after the play to chat with Tamar. He stole the show but looked smaller off stage than he did as Washington. I said something about that and he said, “That’s because everyone else in the cast is so short.” He looked like his father but his voice needs to drop a few more octaves before he has the Barry White thing.

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BC/AD Cusp

For our second day in the big city we planned to meet up with my brother at the Metropolitan Museum of Art to take in the Surrealism show. Peter Schjedahl, writing in last week’s New Yorker, described the Metropolitan Museum’s “Surrealism Beyond Borders” as a deliriously entertaining survey.

Statue in the Greek and Roman wing of the Metropolitan Museum
Statue in the Greek and Roman wing of the Metropolitan Museum

We were a little bit early so we wandered through the Greek and Roman wing. This is one of my favorite parts of the museum. It is curious to me how these two civilizations, both around the BC/AD cusp, were depicting people that feel so human today. The Greeks idealized the form while the Romans depicted the unglamorous as well as the mighty. Then it seems we didn’t come out of the Dark Ages until the Renaissance. I realize this is an uninformed abbreviation of art history but that is the way it strikes me. The Michael Rockefeller wing, where they keep the secrets of the Asmat, is right next door to this wing. They are renovating it and I’m anxiously awaiting its reopening.

"Jucambe" by Agustín Cárdenas at "Surrealism Beyond Borders" Metropolitan Museum
“Jucambe” by Agustín Cárdenas at “Surrealism Beyond Borders” Metropolitan Museum

There were some photos in the Surrealism exhibit that really sent me, especially by the Colombian Cecilia Porras, along with a Agustín Cárdenas sculpture and the May Ray sewing machine wrapped in a wool blanket but Surrealism, especially the paintings, is not for me. This was made perfectly clear when we exited the show and came face to face with Max Beckmann’s “The Old Actress painting. And in the next room a series of gorgeous Rothko’s.

After the show we cleansed our palette with a stroll through Central Park.

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Call & Response

Stanley Whitney painting at Lisson Gallery in Chelsea
Stanley Whitney painting at Lisson Gallery in Chelsea

As soon as we read that Stanley Whitney cranks Miles’ “Bitches Brew” each time he paints we knew Lisson Gallery would be our first stop in Chelsea. He puts a color down and responds to it with his next move, a call and response, similar to Miles Davis’s late sixties soundscapes. Needless to say, the show was a delight. These large paintings stop you dead in your tracks.

In a summer program at Skidmore College in 1968 Whitney became the favorite of his teacher Philip Guston. He credits Guston with teaching him how to put a painting together. Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo has a Stanley Whitney retrospective on its calendar for 2023.

Olga De Amara wall hanging at Lisson Gallery in New York
Olga De Amara wall hanging at Lisson Gallery in New York

And once we were at Lisson we discovered the Columbian textile art, Olga de Amaral. A revelation. A block away Gilbert and George were showing their “New Normal Pictures.” We spent nearly an hour on a bench in a white room looking at a barely discernible yellow sphere by Helen Pashgian. Lucy Raven’s video installation, “Ready Mix,” at Dia Chelsea was stunning. Chelsea still has the goods.

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